What Happens if You Die Without a Will in Hawaii?

Most people know they need a will. And many of them fully intend on writing a will...someday. But life in Honolulu and across Hawaii gets busy and creating a will keeps getting put off. Eventually, "someday" becomes never. In fact, nearly half of American adults will die without a will in place. So what happens if you die without one?


The Hawaii Legislature Writes Your Will


Hawaii’s legislature has passed laws that dictate who will get the property of someone who dies without a valid will. These are called the laws of “intestate succession.” (“Testament” is simply another name for a will. If you die without a will, you are said to have died “intestate”—that is, without a testament.)


The laws of intestate succession generally give your property to your heirs at law - your nearest family members. If you leave a spouse and children (or grandchildren), your property will usually be divided among them. If you die without children, some of your property will be given to your parents, siblings, nieces, or nephews depending on who outlives you. If you don’t leave any close family members, your property may be divided among more extended family, such as grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. In the rare situation where you don’t have any close enough blood relatives alive when you die, the Hawaii government gets to have your property.


As an example, suppose that you live in Hawaii and your only close family members are your spouse and your parents. Under Hawaii law, if you die without a will, your spouse will get the first $200,000, plus three-fourths of any balance of the intestate estate and your parents would get one-fourth. But if you leave behind your spouse and three children, then your spouse will get the entire intestate estate if the children belong to both of you and the surviving spouse doesn't have any other children from a previous relationship.


Without a will, you also have no control over what happens to your family heirlooms or other special items. In a will, for example, you can leave your wedding ring to your daughter, or your coin collection to your brother. But without a will, all those special things may end up being sold so that the money can be divided among your heirs.


A Judge Chooses the Guardian for Your Children


If you have young children, maybe the most important part of your will is naming someone to be their guardian, in case both you and your children’s other parent die.


It always takes a court order to appoint a guardian. But the judge will appoint the person you name in your will, unless there are serious reasons not to (for example, if the person has been convicted of child abuse). If you die without a will, however, and haven’t named a guardian, the judge will have to choose someone without your input.


As careful and caring as the judge may be, he or she doesn’t know your children or what you would decide for them. The judge may make a decision that you would never make yourself. And if a guardian has to be named, he or she will become the most important person in your children’s lives, helping them overcome the tragedy of losing their parents and influencing them to go on to lead happy, productive lives. Do you really want to leave that decision up to a complete stranger?


This article is a service of the Law Office of Keoni Souza, LLC, an estate planning law firm in Honolulu, Hawaii. We don’t just draft documents; we ensure you make informed and empowered decisions about life and death, for yourself and the people you love. That's why we offer a Family Wealth Planning Session, ™ during which you will get more financially organized than you’ve ever been before, and make all the best choices for the people you love. You can begin by contacting our office today to schedule a Family Wealth Planning Session and mention this article to find out how to get this $750 session at no charge.


DISCLAIMER: All information available at this website are for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. You should contact an attorney directly regarding your specific situation. Use of and access to this website or any of the email links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship between the Law Office of Keoni Souza, LLC and any users or any other party.

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All information available on this website is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. You should contact an attorney directly regarding your specific situation. The use of and access to this website or the transmission of information via email or through this website does not create an attorney-client relationship between the Law Office of Keoni Souza, LLC and any users or any other party. Transmission of information via email or through this website may not be secure, therefore confidentiality cannot be assumed.  By using this website or transmitting information via email or this website, the user agrees to this information being collected, stored, or transmitted to a third-party.

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